Gator cakes and shipmates

 
 
In an effort to beat the projected high winds that have been predicted, we shoved off at 0645 from Hammock Beach and headed north toward St. Augustine which is only 25 miles distant. The ride was fairly uneventful until we turned up the San Sebastian River toward our marina. That is when the winds really started kicking up and we became concerned about docking in both wind and current in a strange marina. We would just have to get close and take a look. We could always turn and go back down to the ICW and wait it out.

 
 
 
 
 
 
As we reached Rivers Edge Marina, formerly Oyster Creek Marina, it was getting hairy. We passed the entrance to the marina and went upstream about one half mile to a wide place and turned back to take another look. Marina personnel were waiting on the dock so it was decided to try and enter. I shouted to ask just how wide the slip was as it looked very narrow to us. The man said 14 feet. Cbay is 13’10” and that does not compute. However it was the front of the slip that was 14′ and the pilings at the rear looked wider. Jan said we were going bow in due to the wind and I agreed because we would never fit backing in. She slid it in in one try without banging. How about that? 

Rivers Edge is a quaint little marina with a staff that is very accomodating. We think we will enjoy it here.

 
 
A quick shower and we rode bikes into the city. The architecture here is magnificent. Just shows what riches can do when they are properly applied. We had lunch at a little bakery on the Flagler College campus. They have these chocolate covered hot peppers called datils which they claim only grow in this area. If you eat one they take your picture and put it on the Wall of Flame. If you ever find yourself in St. Augustine and in the Hot Spot Bakery just look up and see if you can find two familiar faces. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Our goal today was to visit the Castillo de San Marcos which is the Spanish fortress that defends the harbor entrance from the Atlantic. A magnificent structure made of cocina which is coral rock. The advantage was that when attacking troops fired seige cannon at the fort the walls, which were 17 feet thick at the base and 9 feet thick at the top, would absorb the shock and not crack as normal rock would. This fort was never successfully taken though six times it changed hands due to treaties. A great fort.

After the fort we purchased Old Town Trolley passes and took the tour. This way we could see the whole town in 90 minutes and tomorrow we will return and visit the things that interest us. One hint: I ate gator cakes for dinner at Hurricane Patty’s to prepare for tomorrow’s big event.

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